Philadelphia athlete speaks on panel at Jefferson University

Note: The following is from the Special Olympics Fall Panel Evaluation Report provided by Allison R. Casola, PhD, MPH, CHES – Department of Family and Community Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University.

On October 17, 2019, Dr. Mary Stephens organized a student event at Thomas Jefferson University to promote involvement and volunteer opportunities with Special Olympics Pennsylvania. During the event conversations surrounding the multitude of volunteer opportunities available with Special Olympics, the importance of Special Olympics for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) both during and outside of competitions, and the sense of community engagement Special Olympics can provide for individuals with IDD and their families ensued.

Philadelphia athlete leader John Mitchell speaks on the panel at Jefferson University.

The program was part of the National Curriculum Initiative in Developmental Medicine (NCIDM) efforts. John Mitchell, and athlete leader from Philadelphia, and SOPA’s Director of Programming Projects at spoke to roughly 60 Jefferson students, medical residents, faculty, and community members as part of the educational event.

Also discussed were barriers that persons with IDD face when it comes to seeking medical care, and possible strategies to maximize healthcare and provider-related experiences for persons with IDD and their families.

The program was part of the National Curriculum Initiative in Developmental Medicine (NCIDM) efforts. John Mitchell, and athlete leader from Philadelphia, and SOPA’s Director of Programming Projects at spoke to roughly 60 Jefferson students, medical residents, faculty, and community members as part of the educational event.

To read the full report from Dr. Casola, follow this link.

Published by

Special Olympics Pennsylvania

The mission of Special Olympics Pennsylvania is to provide year-round sports training and competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy, and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills, and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes, and the community.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s